Acne And How to Prevent

What is acne?

The word acne comes from the word acme meaning "the highest point," which comes from the Greek akme meaning "point" or "spot" - it was originally misspelt, with an 'n' rather than an 'm' in 1835.

Acne

Acne, medically known as Acne Vulgaris, is a skin disease that involves the oil glands at the base of hair follicles.

In humans, pimples tend to appear on the face, back, chest, shoulders and neck.

Simply put - skin cells, sebum and hair can clump together into a plug, this plug gets infected with bacteria, resulting in a swelling. A pimple starts to develop when the plug begins to break down.

 

Scientists from the Washington University School of Medicine found that there are good and bad strains of bacteria that determine the severity and frequency of developing acne. They explained in the Journal of Investigative Dermatology (March 2013 issue) that not all acne bacteria trigger pimples - in fact, one strain they identified can help keep the skin pimple-free.

Acne, medically known as Acne Vulgaris, is a skin disease that involves the oil glands at the base of hair follicles. It commonly occurs during puberty when the sebaceous (oil) glands come to life - the glands are stimulated by male hormones produced by the adrenal glands of both males and females.

Acne is not dangerous, but can leave skin scars. Human skin has pores (tiny holes) which connect to oil glands located under the skin. The glands are connected to the pores via follicles - small canals. These glands produce Sebum, an oily liquid. The sebum carries dead skin cells through the follicles to the surface of the skin. A small hair grows through the follicle out of the skin. Pimples grow when these follicles get blocked, resulting in an accumulation of oil under the skin.

Fast facts on acne

  • Acne is a skin disease that involves the oil glands at the base of hair follicles.
  • Acne commonly occurs during puberty.
  • Acne is not dangerous, but can leave skin scars.
  • Types of pimples include whiteheads, blackheads, papules, pustules, nobules, cysts.
  • Approximately three-quarters of 11 to 30 year-olds will get acne at some time.
  • Acne can affect people of all races and all ages.
  • Experts believe the primary cause is a rise in androgen levels (hormone).
  • A susceptibility to acne could also be genetic.
  • Treatment for acne may depend on how severe and persistent it is.
  • Acne can be affected by the menstrual cycle, anxiety and stress, hot and humid climates, oil based makeup, greasy hair and pimple squeezing.

The types of acne pimples

Human skin has pores (tiny holes) which connect to oil glands located under the skin. The glands are connected to the pores via follicles - small canals. These glands produce Sebum, an oily liquid. The sebum carries dead skin cells through the follicles to the surface of the skin.

Whiteheads - remain under the skin and are very small

Blackheads - clearly visible, they are black and appear on the surface of the skin. Remember that a blackhead is not caused by dirt. Scrubbing your face vigorously when you see blackheads will not help

Papules - visible on the surface of the skin. They are small bumps, usually pink

Pustules - clearly visible on the surface of the skin. They are red at their base and have pus at the top

Nobules - clearly visible on the surface of the skin. They are large, solid pimples. They are painful and are embedded deep in the skin

Cysts - clearly visible on the surface of the skin. They are painful, and are filled with pus. Cysts can easily cause scars.

 

Tips for Preventing Acne

1. Keep your face clean. Whether or not you have acne, it's important to wash your face twice daily to remove impurities, dead skin cells, and extra oil from your skin's surface. Washing more often than twice daily is not necessarily better; it may do more harm than good. Use warm, not hot, water and a mild facial cleanser. Using a harsh soap (like deodorant body soap) can hurt the already inflamed skin and cause more irritation.

Avoid scrubbing your skin harshly with a washcloth, exfoliating glove, or loofah (a coarse-textured sponge). Gently wash it with your clean hands. Always rinse well, and then dry your face with disposable paper towel. Don't share towels, as dirty towels spread bacteria.

2. Moisturize. Many acne products contain ingredients that dry the skin, so always use a moisturizer that minimizes dryness and skin peeling. Look for "noncomedogenic" on the label, which means it should not cause acne. There are moisturizers made for oily, dry, or combination skin.

3. Try an over-the-counter acne product. These acne products don't need a prescription. They may have ingredients such as benzoyl peroxide 10%, salicylic acid 2%, glycolic acid, or lactic acid, which curb bacteria and dry your skin. Start with a small amount at first. Then you can adjust how much you use and how often, depending on how much peeling or drying you have. Use these products with caution if you have sensitive skin.

4. Use makeup sparingly. During a breakout, avoid wearing foundation, powder, or blush. If you do wear makeup, wash it off at the end of the day and use disposable sponges for makeup application. If possible, choose oil-free cosmetics without added dyes and chemicals. Choose makeup that is labeled as "noncomedogenic," meaning it should not cause acne. Read the ingredients list on the product label before buying. 

5. Watch what you put on your hair. Avoid using fragrances, oils, pomades, or gels on your hair. If they get on your face, they can block your skin's pores and irritate your skin. Use a gentle shampoo and conditioner. Oily hair can add to the oil on your face, so wash your hair often, especially if you're breaking out. Got long hair? Keep it pulled away from your face. Wash your hair every other day.

6. Keep your hands off your face. Avoid touching your face or propping your cheek or chin on your hands. Not only can you spread bacteria, you can also irritate the already inflamed facial skin. Never pick or pop pimples with your fingers, as it can lead to infection and scarring.

7. Stay out of the sun. The sun's ultraviolet rays can increase inflammation and redness. Some acne medications may make your skin more sensitive to sunlight. Wear protective clothing, such as a long-sleeved shirt, pants, and a broad-brimmed hat. Whether you have pimples or not, always apply sunscreen with SPF 30 or higher at least 20 minutes before sun exposure. Look for "noncomedogenic" on the sunscreen label to make new pimples less likely. Read the ingredients on the product label to know what you're putting on your skin.

8. Feed your skin. It makes sense to avoid greasy food and junk food and add more fresh fruits and vegetables and whole grains to your diet.

9. Exercise daily. Regular exercise is good for your whole body, including your skin. When you exercise, avoid wearing clothing or using exercise equipment that rubs your skin and may cause irritation. Shower or bathe right after exercise.

10. Control your stress! Some studies link stress with the severity of pimples or acne. Ask yourself what's making you feel stressed. Then look for solutions.

11. Change your case pillow two times per week and your clothes bet 1 time per week. Your pillowcases, bedsheets, and even your couch cushions retain a great deal of bacteria, dead skin cells, dust mites, and a variety of other unsavory things.

12. Wear only clean clothes. Your clothes pick up and harbor oil from your body’s skin. Especially if you experience acne on other parts of your body, only wearing clean clothes can help combat acne. Change clothes after sweating. Especially change underwear, bras, and other clothing near the affected area.

13. Talk to your doctor about antibiotics. Oral and topical antibiotics may be used to treat acne, especially when reinfection is a concern. Topical antibiotics can be used long-term, usually along with benzoyl peroxide or retinoids. Oral antibiotics are usually used short-term to get a bad breakout under control. Antibiotics are especially useful for inflammatory acne, which is acne with a lot of red bumps, pimples, or cysts.

 

When in doubt, check with a dermatologist to see if you need more treatment to prevent or stop acne.

 

Sources: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/

https://www.futurederm.com/how-often-should-you-change-your-pillowcase/

http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Acne-Reinfection

http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/acne/acne-vulgaris-medications 

 

Contact your Esthetician with any questions or concerns. 754-234-9754 Sandra Sanchez, Miami, Florida